Regarding Melissa #22

…..Previously

In 2015, at the time Mel began work in the shop, Jamie had no girlfriends in tow– that had been the case for several months now. Lucy was beginning to  despair of ever having grandchildren until Tracy had obliged a few weeks previously. Still, it would be nice if Jamie were to meet someone suitable.

Continued…..

CHAPTER FOUR

The Hannay family

Mel was the main subject of conversation during the evening meal at the Hannays’ house that first day for her in the shop. Tony hadn’t seen much of Mel, but Lucy and Jamie were really pleased by her attitude, her appearance, her enthusiasm and by how quickly she was learning.

Tony and Jamie had both realised, from Mel’s interview, whereabouts she lived, and they were quite familiar with that estate. The Hannays’ house was also in Upperton, but on a different small development, further down the hill from Mel’s address. Both estates  had been developed  in the late 1970s. The Hannays’ house was one of four, three-bedroomed detached houses. Two of the family cars – those of Lucy and Jamie – stood on the gravelled driveway that took up much of the house’s frontage. Tony’s car was in the garage.

Compared against the Harrington home, Tony and Lucy’s house was quite traditionally furnished and equipped. The rooms were smaller, the ceilings were lower and the garden was more modest.

The family was quite closely knit. The shop had originally been owned by Tony’s grandfather, Duncan Hannay,  who’d opened the shop just after the Second World War. Duncan was the son of a native Scotsman, who’d moved  to England  with his parents at the beginning of the twentieth century.  Born in 1920, Duncan had missed the first World War, but he’d been a war photographer during the second conflict – in the Army Film and Photographic Unit. He’d been trained in battle photography, but it hadn’t prepared him for some of the sights he’d encountered.

When the unit was disbanded in 1946, Duncan had turned his knowledge of cameras and photographic equipment to use as a civilian. He’d learned where to get hold of some Eastern European cameras cheaply to begin his business – and had sold them at first on a market stall and later from the shop premises he’d rented, but had eventually purchased. His son, Alec, had taken over running the business when Duncan stepped down. Alec’s son, Tony, had worked  in the shop from leaving school and, in turn, had taken over the shop in 2005, when Alec had retired aged sixty-five..

During the meal, Tony wondered aloud, whether Mel might be related to Brian Harrington, one of the shop’s regular clients, whom they knew lived in that area.. Slightly older than the Harringtons, the senior Hannays were both in their early fifties, while Jamie was twenty-six – some eighteen months older than his sister, Tracy. It was Tracy – who’d got married soon after university – whose recently born baby, Elaine, would be looked after by Lucy and by her grandparents on both sides. Tracy lived with her partner, Jake, and their child on an estate on the other side of the town and overlooking a lake. Jake was a paramedic and Tracy would shortly be returning to work as a nurse at the local hospital.

Featured Photo

The photo that I’ve chosen today is the ninth of the series that I’ll be posting in this part of my daily blog in this part of the page. As I said previously, the series is based on a walk that I did on the 19th April along the bank of the Leeds to Liverpool canal between Burscough Bridge and the ‘Ring O’Bells’ pub just over a mile away. I did the walk in both directions, accompanied by my daughter’s dog, Ted.

Today I’ve chosen an image of re-purposed, old farm implements seen in a farmyard alongside the canal. The EXIF data are as follows: Camera used was my 24 MP Pentax KP cropped sensor camera paired with a Pentax 28-105 mm f/3.5-5.6 full-frame lens. The shutter speed was 1/125 secs @ f/8 and 28 mm. The ISO was 100. The shot was handheld.

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